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Agricultural and Extension Education

 

Master | Agricultural and Extension Education

Program Format:   
Entrance Exam: GRE

The Master's of  Agricultural and Extension Education is designed primarily for people who currently  teach agriculture at the middle school, high school and/or post-secondary level or who are currently working or desire to work with the Cooperative Extension Service.  

Student's gain an in-depth knowledge of the context and content of extension education or school-based agricultural education. It should be noted that completion of this degree does NOT result in certification to teach high school agriculture. We offer a program know as LEAP (Licensure in Education for Agricultural Professionals) for those who desire to be certified to teach agriculture in the public schools. It is possible to combine the two programs together and work on both simultaneously.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

Applicants for admission must present:

  • Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • GRE scores
  • Writing sample

Students may start the program in the fall or spring semesters or in summer sessions.

Graduate School application deadlines are:

  • Fall Semester - June 25 for US Students, March 1 for International Students
  • Spring Semester - November 25 for US Students, July 15 for International Students
  • Summer Semester I - March 25 for US Students, December 15 for International Students
  • Summer Semester II - May 10 for US Students, December 15 for International Students

PLAN OF STUDY

This degree program is 36 semester hours in length. This program is designed to be completed on-campus or entirely by distance education.

The requirements for the Master's of Agricultural and Extension Education degree are as follows. Where there are choices one should select courses appropriate for their concentration - either agricultural education or extension education:

  • Complete the core required courses (15 hours).
  • Complete 21 hours of electives - the student is allowed to take 21 hours of elective courses. These can be in AEE or can be in disciplines such as Animal Science, Crop Science, Horticulture,  Entomology, Forestry, Youth Development and Family Life Education, etc. At the Master's level one can declare a minor but does not have to. Typically. declaring a minor means the student will take 9-12  hours in a specialty and work with a professor from that area.
  • Complete a culminating project

To demonstrate an understanding and mastery of the theories, principles, and practice of agricultural and extension education each student is required to complete a major self-directed creative or research based project. The student will sign up for either AEE 693 or AEE 620 for 3 hours of credit. The student will present the results of their project to the AEE 601 seminar class (however the student does not have to be enrolled in AEE 601 to do this. The student will  be scheduled to make a presentation in the same manner that outside guest speakers are scheduled). Or the student can make a presentation at a professional conference such as the summer agriculture teacher conference or at an extension meeting. Students at a distance will either use distance education technology to make the presentation or upload a video file to a file-sharing web site so that the culminating activity can be shown to the class.

The culminating activity should utilize and demonstrate the knowledge gained across the spectrum of courses completed in the Master’s program.

Examples of possible culminating activities could include (but are not limited to the following):

Action Research. Teachers select an aspect of their teaching to systematically investigate, such as their wait time during questioning. They record data and consider theories from the research literature, drawing conclusions about how teaching is influencing learning and vice versa, and informing future instructional decisions. The primary intent of action research is to improve the teachers’ immediate classroom teaching; secondarily, if applicable, the intent is to generalize it across other contexts in the school or beyond. Students seeking “M” teaching licensure are required to complete this type of culminating product. More information about the action research project is found below.

Course/Curriculum Development. The individual will develop a teaching unit or course that includes lesson plans, instructional materials (handouts, PowerPoints, etc.) group activities, and assessment instruments. A supporting web site might be created. Some or all of the instructional materials/activities will then be implemented in an actual setting and evaluated. The student will reflect on the process and outcomes of the project.

Research Inquiry. The student will conduct a small-scale research project. This could be a descriptive or correlation research study that focuses on areas of concern for the profession such as job satisfaction, teacher turnover, needs assessment, etc. Standard research procedures and protocols will be used.

Coaching or Mentoring - The student will formally coach or mentor a beginning teacher or agent. A plan will be developed for the mentoring/coaching activity. An instructional coach provides ongoing consistent follow-up by way of demonstrations, observations, and conversations with new professionals as they implement new strategies and knowledge.

Upon completion of the program, the student will receive the Master's degree and can also apply for the Master's (M) teaching license from the state of North Carolina (one has to apply for the teaching license-it does not automatically happen).  It should be noted that one has to first have the initial teaching license (the "A") before  applying for the "M". If one does not have the "A" license it is possible to work on that license while in the graduate program. This is done by enrolling simultaneously in the NCSU LEAP program.

The course requirements for the Master's of Agricultural and Extension Education degree are as follows. Where there are choices one should select courses appropriate for their concentration - either agricultural education or extension education:

Core required courses - 15 hours

AEE 501 - Foundations Of Agricultural and Extension Education

Units: 3

Development and organization of agricultural and extension education in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on role of societal and scientific changes, the federal government and philosophy on evolution of agricultural and extensioneducation.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2016 Fall Term

AEE 578 - Scientific Inquiry in Agricultural and Extension Education

Units: 3

Philosophy, design, interpretation and practice of scientific research in agricultural and extension education, with a particular focus on the skills necessary to be an effective and critical "consumer" of research that is practiced within the field. Web based course.

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2016 Fall Term

Curriculum/Program Planning - 3 hours. Choose one:

AEE 521 - Program Planning in Agricultural and Extension Education

Units: 3

Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory group; organization and use of facilities.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2016 Fall Term

AEE 524 - Coordinating the High School Agricultural Education Program

Units: 3

Principles of program planning applied to educational programs about agriculture; theory and field experiences in planning, organizing, and evaluating secondary agricultural education programs; development of plans for conducting all aspects of the complete agricultural education programs.

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term

AEE 529 - Curriculum Development in Agricultural and Extension Education

Units: 3

Design and development of data based curriculum and curriculum evaluation procedures in agricultural and extension education. Critique of curriculum development models, contemporary trends and issues, curriculum resources and accountability tools.Analysis of the use of national and state standards as well as local community needs in curriculum development.

Offered in Spring Only

Instructional Methodology - 3 hours. Choose one:

AEE 523 - Adult Education in Agriculture

Units: 3

Designed to meet needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to study some of basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention given to problem of fitting educational program for adults into public school program and other educational programs as well as to methods of teaching adults.

Offered in Fall Only

AEE 535 - Teaching Agriculture in Secondary Schools

Units: 3

Application of theoretical models and research on effective teaching in secondary agricultural education programs. teaching strategies, planning required, and instructional management for students with varying backgrounds. Evaluation of student learning and teacher evaluation of instruction.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

2016 Fall Term

AEE 735 - Effective Teaching in Agriculture and Life Sciences

Units: 3

Theory and practice of effective teaching in agricultural and life sciences. Emphasis on course planning, teaching and learning styles, instructional techniques, laboratory instruction, text construction, student evaluation, instructional technology, and faculty roles and responsibilities.

Culminating Master's Project - 3 hours. Choose one:

AEE 620 - Special Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education

Units: 1 - 6

Exploration of topics of special interest not covered by existing courses by individual students under faculty member's directions. Readings and independent study, problems or research not related to a thesis.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term 2016 Fall Term

AEE 693 - Master's Supervised Research

Units: 1 - 9

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term 2016 Fall Term

Tuition Level: Graduate

Resident
Cost per Credit Hour: $411.88
Total Estimated Cost for 36 Credits Completed at NC State: $14,827.68

Non-resident
Cost per Credit Hour: $1,007.88
Total Estimated Cost for 36 Credits Completed at NC State: $36,283.68

Approximate cost per semester: $3,706.92 based on 9 credit hours

Note: There may be additional fees associated with Distance Education courses for verification of student identity for proctored examinations. These fees will be paid directly by the student to the proctor or facility and are not charged to your student account.

More about Online and Distance Education Tuition

Entry Semester Application Deadlines and Details
FallJun 25 (US); Mar 1 (Int)
SpringNov 25 (US); Jul 15 (Int)
Summer 1Mar 25 (US); Dec 15 (Int)
Summer 2May 10 (US); Dec 15 (Int)

Dr. Gary Moore

Director of Graduate Studies, Agricultural and Extension Education

919-515-1756
gary_moore@ncsu.edu