Mechanical Engineering Systems concentration - Havelock

 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering | Mechanical Engineering Systems concentration - Havelock

Program Format:   
Entrance Exam: Not required

The NC State University Mechanical Engineering Systems (MES) BSE program is a site-based program located on the campus of Craven Community College in Havelock, North Carolina.  Students in the program earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering with a concentration in Mechanical Engineering Systems. Upon graduation from the MES program, students will be qualified to apply for any job seeking mechanical engineering applicants.

Overview of NC State MES Program

Difference Between MES and ME

 

In the Mechanical Engineering Systems BSE program, you will receive a solid foundation in mechanical engineering principles including structural mechanics, materials, fluid mechanics, dynamics, vibrations, controls, thermal sciences, mechanical design, and thermal design. You will also receive training in the formal systems engineering approach to the design and realization of integrated systems. Your training in formal systems engineering will give you the ability to understand and work through the broad complex issues involved with integrated systems. Your training in mechanical engineering principles will give you the skill and confidence required to understand and solve detailed technical problems. The unique combination of these skills will prepare you well to meet the technical and non-technical challenges of today's engineering workplace.

The MES program combines site-based general education courses with engineering courses taught by both local NC State faculty and NC State faculty in Raleigh.  The 10 mechanical engineering courses in the MES program are taught by the nationally recognized NC State MAE faculty in Raleigh and delivered to MES students in Havelock via interactive high-definition video teleconference.  Local NC State faculty teach the Systems Engineering content, conduct all laboratory experiences, and direct students in the two-semester capstone design experience where they are partnered with an industry sponsor to design and build a solution to a real-world problem.

Hands-on laboratory exercises allow students to explore and experience theoretical concepts learned in their courses and practice important modern skills such as manual and computerized measurement techniques, data analysis, design of experiments and technical communications.

The MES program is located within a short distance of the Naval Air Systems Command’s Fleet Readiness Center-East (FRC-E) at Cherry Point.  FRC-E is North Carolina’s largest industrial employer east of Interstate Highway 95 (I-95).  The MES program takes advantage of the synergies afforded by its close location and relationship with the more than 700 civilian engineers working at FRC-E.

This program may lead to Professional Licensure.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

The Mechanical Engineering Systems BSE is a transfer program. This means students first satisfy the transfer requirement for the College of Engineering at another institution and then transfer into the NC State Mechanical Engineering Systems BSE program.

Students begin the MES program by taking their general education courses such as calculus, chemistry, physics and humanities at one of North Carolina’s Community Colleges or from another approved university program. Once students satisfy all the NC State College of Engineering transfer requirements, they apply for acceptance into the College of Engineering at NC State as a transfer student majoring in the MES program. Prior to submitting your NC State application you must contact  Dr. Bill Fortney, director, Engineering Site-based Programs in Havelock.

Transfer requirements for the MES program are given below.

NC State Transfer Requirements

Transfer requirements for the MES program and the general transfer eligibility requirements for on-campus programs are given below. Students are encouraged the check the on-line College of Engineering transfer requirements since many departments have adopted additional GPA and course requirements.

  1. 30 credit hours or more of transferable college-level courses
  2. 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA on all transferable college-level courses
  3. Two college-level English composition courses (ENG 111 and ENG 112 or ENG 113 or ENG 114)
  4. College-level chemistry course with lab (CHM 151 or 131 can be used in some cases)
  5. 2.0 or better NCSU GPA.
  6. Calculus I and Calculus II (MAT 271 & MAT 272) with at least a 2.5 GPA in the last two calculus or higher college mathematics classes taken.
  7. Calculus-based physics-I (PHY 251)

If you already applied to NC State and want your application reviewed for entry to the MES program or you are already an NC State student and are interested in joining the MES program, e-mail Dr. Bill Fortney, director, Engineering Site-based Programs in Havelock.

If you need to take courses to meet the transfer requirements, most MES students attend Craven Community College. To get started at Craven Community College,  complete an online application and then make an appointment to talk with an advisor. In Havelock, you may contact Walter Calabrese at 252.444.0739.

NC State Transfer Process

PLAN OF STUDY

MES students are drawn from a diverse population that includes not only traditional college students, but also both former and active-duty military personnel and civilian personnel from FRC-E.  Students can complete the program on a full-time or part-time basis.

In addition to the technical aspect of the curriculum, the MES program also offers opportunities for professional development of non-technical skills that are essential to excel in an engineering career.  The voluntary Professional Development Program (PDP) will help students develop personal traits essential for operating as a technical professional in a business environment.  Students work with a faculty member and/or current mid-level engineering manager to hone their professionalism, technical credibility, work ethic, ability to communicate and ability to work with people in a professional environment.

Most students will first attend Craven Community College (CCC) to satisfy their transfer requirements.  Students can complete their transfer requirements at another institution, however, those students who take their general education courses at CCC have the advantage of being able to begin their sophomore level mechanical engineering courses while still a CCC student.  CCC students can take NC State courses as a visiting NC State student while they apply for transfer into the NC State College of Engineering (COE) and the MES program.

Upon admission to the NC State MES program, students continue taking their engineering course work through NC State on the campus of CCC.

CAREER PROSPECTS

The MES program combines training in formal systems engineering with training in mechanical engineering principles. This unique combination prepares students well for the technical and non-technical challenges of today's engineering workplace. Upon graduation, students are qualified for any job seeking mechanical engineering applicants.

Degree Courses Taught by NC State

MAE 206 - Engineering Statics

Units: 3

Basic concepts of forces in equilibrium. Distributed forces, frictional forces. Inertial properties. Application to machines, structures, and systems. Credit is not allowed for both MAE 206 and CE 214.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MSE 201 - Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials

Units: 3

Introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and constitution of metallic and nonmetallic materials and the relationships among these principles and the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of engineering materials.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

GC 120 - Foundations of Graphics

Units: 3

Introductory course providing orientation to language of graphics for students majoring in any field. Designed to help develop ability to use CAD within the context of a concurrent design process to understand how everyday objects are designed, analyzed and created. Emphasis placed on decision-making processes involved with creating geometry and development of modeling strategies that incorporate intentions of designer.

GEP: Visual & Performing Arts

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MAE 208 - Engineering Dynamics

Units: 3

Kinematics and kinetics of particles in rectangular, cylindrical, and curvilinear coordinate systems; energy and momentum methods for particles; kinetics of systems of particles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; motion relative to rotating coordinate systems.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MAE 214 - Solid Mechanics

Units: 3

Concepts and theories of internal force, stress, strain, and strength of structural element under static loading conditions. Constitutive behavior for linear elastic structures. Deflection and stress analysis procedures for bars, beams, and shafts.Introduction to matrix analysis of structures.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

ST 370 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers

Units: 3

Calculus-based introduction to probability and statistics with emphasis on Monte Carlo simulation and graphical display of data on computer workstations. Statistical methods include point and interval estimation of population parameters and curve and surface fitting [regression analysis]. The principles of experimental design and statistical process control introduced. Credit not allowed for both ST 370 and ST 361 or ST 380

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2018 Spring Term 2018 Fall Term

MES 305 - Mechanical Engineering Systems Lab I

Units: 1

Course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of manual and computer assisted laboratory measurement techniques, data analysis, design of experiments and technical report writing. Students learn to successfully conduct and document an engineering experiment. For MES Majors only.

Offered in Spring Only

MAE 201 - Engineering Thermodynamics I

Units: 3

Introduction to the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfers and transformations of energy. Emphasis on thermodynamic properties and the First and Second Law analysis of systems and control volumes. Integration of these concepts into the analysis of basic power cycles is introduced.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MAE 308 - Fluid Mechanics

Units: 3

Development of the basic equations of fluid mechanics in general and specialized form. Application to a variety of topics including fluid statics; inviscid, incompressible fluid flow; design of Fluid dynamic system.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MAE 315 - Dynamics of Machines

Units: 3

Application of dynamics to the analysis and design of machine and mechanical components. Motions resulting from applied loads, and the forces required to produce specified motions. Introduction to mechanical vibration, free and forced response of discrete and continuous systems.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MES 300 - Systems Engineering

Units: 4

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of formal systems engineering. Students are exposed to systems thinking, systems modeling and performing engineering design within a formal systems engineering framework. They will perform requirements definition and analysis, system architecting, test and integration plan development, economic evaluation of alternatives, and formal technical reviews. Requires Junior standing.

Offered in Fall Only

MAE 316 - Strength of Mechanical Components

Units: 3

Analysis and design of mechanical components based on deflection, material, static strength and fatigue requirements. Typical components include beams, shafts, pressure vessels and bolted and welded joints. Classical and modern analysis and design techniques. Computer analysis using the finite element method. Material and manufacturing considerations in design.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

ECE 331 - Principles of Electrical Engineering

Units: 3

Concepts, units and methods of analysis in electrical engineering. Analysis of d-c and a-c circuits, characteristics of linear and non-linear electrical devices; principles of operational amplifiers; transformers; motors; and filters.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology

Units: 3

Written communication in industrial and technical organizations, emphasizing internal communication with managers and technical personnel and including external communication with regulators, vendors, and clients. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students in engineering and other primarily technological curricula.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, ENG 332, and ENG 333.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2018 Spring Term 2018 Summer Term 1 2018 Summer Term 2 2018 Fall Term

MAE 435 - Principles of Automatic Control

Units: 3

Study of linear feedback control systems using transfer functions. Transient and steady state responses. Stability and dynamic analyses using time response and frequency response techniques. Compensation methods. Classical control theory techniquesfor determination and modification of the dynamic response of a system. Synthesis and design applications to typical mechanical engineering control systems. Introduction to modern control theory.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MAE 415 - Analysis for Mechanical Engineering Design

Units: 3

Integration of the physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering to solve real-world design problems. Emphasis on open-ended problems which contain superfluous information and/or insufficient data. Solution techniques focus on problem definition,reduction to a solvable system, and development of a design response. Formal written communication of results.

Offered in Fall and Spring

MAE 310 - Heat Transfer Fundamentals

Units: 3

Analysis of steady state and transient one and multidimensional heat conduction employing both analytical methods and numerical techniques. Integration of principles and concepts of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to the development of practicalconvective heat transfer relations relevant to mechanical engineers. Heat transfer by the mechanism of radiation heat transfer.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

MES 401 - MES Capstone Design I

Units: 3

This course is first of a two-semester engineering design and manufacturing experience which is the culmination of the MES student's undergraduate education experience. In teams, students design, cost, and build a working prototype to solve a real-world engineering problem supplied by an industry partner. Students follow a systems engineering approach to manage their project through a requirements definition review, a preliminary design review, and the completion of detailed design. Students develop communication skills through reports and presentations and gain insight into engineering design through guest lectures. Students must provide any transportation needed for this class. MES students only.

Offered in Fall Only

MES 405 - Mechanical Engineering Systems Lab II

Units: 2

In this course, students apply the measurement and experimental techniques learned in MES 305 to explore, experience and verify key theoretical concepts from the fields of thermal science, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, and dynamics and controls. Students learn to successfully design, conduct, analyze, document and present a statistically sound engineering experiment. For MES students only.

Offered in Fall Only

MAE 412 - Design of Thermal System

Units: 3

Applications of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to thermal systems with an emphasis on system design and optimization. Design of heat exchangers. Analysis of engineering economics, including time value of money, present and future worth, payback period, internal rates of return, and cost benefit analysis. Review of component model for pipes, pumps, fans, compressors, turbines, evaporators, condensers and refrigerators. Simulation methods for finding the operating point for thermal systems. Design of thermal systems through methods of optimization.

Offered in Fall and Spring

MES 402 - MES Capstone Design II

Units: 4

This course is second in a two semester engineering design and manufacturing experience which is the culmination of the MES student's undergraduate education experience. In teams, students solve a real-world engineering problem supplied by an industry partner. In the two courses, students follow a formal systems engineering approach to manage their project through the following reviews: System Requirements, Conceptual Design, Preliminary Design, and Critical Design. Students develop written and verbal communication skills and gain insight into engineering design practices through guest lectures from local engineers. Students must provide any transportation needed for this class. MES students only.

Offered in Spring Only

See All Courses Required 
Entry Semester Application Deadlines and Details
FallAugust 20, 2018
SpringJanuary 2, 2019
SummerJune 21, 2018

Dr. Bill Fortney

Director, Engineering Site-Based Programs in Havelock

College of Engineering

252.444.2171
wbfortne@ncsu.edu