Crop Science - Online and Distance Education

Crop Science

 

Courses

Crop Science online courses are designed to provide convenient access to the training that is often required for career advancement. Find descriptions of our courses for the Undergraduate Certificate in Crop Science below.

Required course - 3 credit hours

CS 213 - Crop Science

Units: 3

Our basic premise is that to produce field crops successfully we must know how our crops grow and develop and what they require from the production environment - including the farmer - for satisfactory management of the relevant environment, and finally to successful yield and quality of commercially important product. Especially important is to understand the various ways in which producers must respond to ever-changing circumstances on the farm, at the bank [credit], and in the marketplace. A solid understanding of the impact of cropping history on the soil and entire ecosystem to be used for the next crop also is vitally important.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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2020 Spring Term 2020 Summer Term 1 2020 Fall Term

Elective courses - four courses, totaling minimum of 12 credit hours

CS 210 - Lawns and Sports Turf

Units: 3

Utilization of turfgrasses for lawns and recreational areas. Emphasis on: the cultural and environmental benefits of grassed areas, concepts of grass growth and development, selecting adapted grasses for proper use, techniques for successful establishment and management of cool-and-warm-season turfgrasses, fertilization, irrigation, aeration, and pest management. The history and benefit of natural and artificial sports fields will also be discussed. Credit will not be awarded for both CS 200 and CS 210.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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2020 Spring Term 2020 Fall Term

CS 216 - Southern Row Crop Production - Cotton, Peanuts, and Tobacco

Units: 3

Crop production systems comprised of cotton, peanuts, and tobacco are unique to the southern United States, and management practices tailored to a successful harvest are vastly different than those employed in the production of grain crops. CS 216 will introduce students to these production standards and provide a basic foundation for the principles of cotton, peanut, and tobacco management. At the conclusion of the course students will be able to describe growth/development patterns, tillage systems, scouting techniques, proper seed/variety selection and planting populations, provide recommendations for pest management, employ Integrated Pest Management strategies, describe harvesting practices, and give marketing approaches for each crop.

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2020 Spring Term

CS 218 - Southern Row Crop Production - Corn, Small Grains and Soybeans

Units: 3

Fundamental agronomic practices associated with the production of corn, small grains and soybean. Discussions will include crop growth and development stages, how to choose the best varieties and hybrids, planting strategies, fertility and pest management programs, harvest and storage options, and the use of technologies associated with the production and maintenance of quality commodity.

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2020 Fall Term

CS 224 - Seeds, Biotechnology and Societies

Units: 3

An exploration of seeds, how seeds are the delivery system for crop biotechnology and how a specific culture's perception of science and agriculture influence the acceptance or rejections of modern genetic technologies. Topics include seed germination, survival and preservation; seed industry influence on societies and how societies are influencing the seed industry; seed production - commercially and at home; how our diverse genetic resources are preserved; how biotechnology is applied to agriculture and delivered through seeds; the impact biotech is having on the seed industry and subsequently on us and global agriculture; concerns and potential benefits of biotechnology application to crops.

GEP: Global Knowledge

GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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2020 Spring Term 2020 Summer Term 1 2020 Fall Term

CS 230 - Introduction to Agroecology

Units: 3

This course will examine the biological and physical attributes of farming systems and their associated ecological and social impacts in temperate and tropical regions. It will address the ecological consequences of indigenous food and fiber production systems, conventional agricultural systems and "alternative" systems that incorporate biological pest control and natural nutrient inputs. Students will examine several case studies that integrate their understanding of concepts.

GEP: Global Knowledge

GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2020 Spring Term 2020 Summer Term 1 2020 Fall Term

CS 312 - Grassland Management for Natural Resources Conservation

Units: 3

Basic principles and practices of production and utilization of pasture and forage crops; impact on developing sustainable systems for livestock feed, soil and water conservation; use of computers to assist in whole farm planning and information retrieval.

Offered in Spring Only

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2020 Spring Term 2020 Summer Term 1

CS 424 - Seed Physiology

Units: 3

This course will explore the physiological processes associated with seed formation, development, maturation, germination, and deterioration of agronomic and horticultural species. We will also study the physiological aspects of seed dormancy, how dormancy is manifested and overcome in cultivated and noncultivated systems and dormancy's impact on weed seedbank ecology.

Offered in Fall Only

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CS 495 - Special Topics in Crop Science

Units: 1 - 6

Offered as needed to present materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for offering of new courses on a trial basis.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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CS 524 - Seed Physiology

Units: 3

This course will explore the physiological processes associated with seed formation, development, maturation, germination, and deterioration of agronomic and horticultural species. We will also study the physiological aspects of seed dormancy, how dormancy is manifested and overcome in cultivated and noncultivated systems and dormancy's impact on weed seedbank ecology.

Offered in Fall Only

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2020 Fall Term

CS 590 - Special Topics

Units: 1 - 6

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in crop science and related fields.

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Courses numbered 499 and below are undergraduate; those numbered 500 and above are graduate.