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General Horticulture

 

Undergraduate Certificate | General Horticulture

Program Format:   
Entrance Exam: Not required

Intended for horticultural professionals and avid gardeners, this certificate in General Horticulture is designed to meet both the foundational and specialized educational needs of non-traditional students at the undergraduate level. Also open to NC State undergraduates.

Intended for horticultural professionals and avid gardeners, the University Undergraduate Certificate in General Horticulture offered by the Department of Horticultural Science is designed to meet both the foundational and specialized educational needs of these non-traditional students at the undergraduate level. Students completing the 15 credit hours of course work will have a strong back ground in horticultural science and techniques and specialization in elective areas of the students choosing. Also open to NC State undergraduates.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

Student seeking the University Certificate in General Horticulture must have completed high school with a GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4-point scale and provide a transcript or copy of other such documentation indicating high school completion and grade point average.

PLAN OF STUDY

The University Certificate in General Horticulture requires 15 credit hours. Students pursuing university certificate programs are considered non-degree studies (NDS) students for the purpose of university registration; NDS students may register for a maximum of 6 credit hours per semester. Thus, the University Certificate in General Horticulture may be completed in as little as three academic terms.

Students must complete the 15 hours of course work required plus any course prerequisites within 4 calendar years, beginning with the date the student commence.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Can’t attend classes at NC State University? Join horticulture professionals and avid gardners who are earning an undergraduate University Certificate in General Horticulture through DELTA/Distance Education at NC State. This certificate program is designed to enhance your horticulture background. Also open to NC State undergraduates.

The University Certificate in General Horticulture is offered to anyone who desires a strong foundation in the principles of horticultural science with an emphasis on current technologies and environmentally responsible practices. Students will be required to complete 6 hours (2 courses) of foundational horticultural course work and select 9 hours (3-4 courses) from a list of electives where the student may choose to specialize in a certain area of horticulture or maintain a broad, general focus. All the course work will be available as distance education courses. With completion of 15 credit hours and a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course, the student will be award a certificate acknowledging their accomplishments.

Required Courses - 6 credit hours

HS 201 - The World of Horticulture: Principles and Practices

Units: 3

Principles of plant growth and development relating to production and utilization of fruit, vegetable, floricultural, and ornamental crops. Historical, economic, and global importance of horticultural crops and services.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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2016 Summer Term 1 2016 Fall Term

HS 203 - Home Plant Propagation

Units: 3

Not for Horticultural Science Majors [SH, THG, THL]. Substitution of HS 203 for HS 301 are not allowed. An introduction to the basic principles of sexual and asexual plant propagation, including seeds, cuttings, layering, Grafting, and Division.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term

Elective Courses - 9 credit hours

Select 3 to 4 courses

HS 200 - Home Horticulture

Units: 3

Introduction and review of home horticulture as it relates to the horticultural enthusiast. A general understanding of plant growth, structure, and development; house plant selection and care, selecting trees, shrubs, and flowers for the home landscape, and other related topics. Note: this course was previously offered as HS 100.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

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2016 Spring Term 2016 Summer Term 1 2016 Fall Term

HS 202 - Power of Plants: Appreciation and Use

Units: 3

Power of Plants will focus on how plants are names and can be used in different horticultural situations and growing environments. Uniqueness, use, and plant descriptions of a wide range of horticultural plants will be considered including bonsai, topiary, espalier, and rain gardens. Not for horticultural science majors [SH, THG, THL].

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Spring Only

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2016 Summer Term 1

HS 204 - Home Landscape Maintenance

Units: 3

An understanding of the basic principles of landscape maintenance including, but not limited to, soil fertility and management, tree biology, pruning, turfgrass maintenance, plant selection, irrigation management and waterwise gardening, integrated pest management, and hardscape construction. Not for Horticultural Science majors [SH, THG, THL].

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2016 Fall Term

HS 250 - Home Landscape Design: Creating Garden Spaces

Units: 3

Home landscape design is a 3-credit hour course for non-landscape design majors. Students will be introduced to the various issues associated with landscape design at the residential level. Through a series of Power Point lectures, on-line discussions, and small projects/exercises, students will gain an understanding of landscape graphics. Skills in design, and develop landscape plans and other forms of landscape graphics. Students will use all of their learned skills to develop a design for a given site using provided design software.

Offered in Summer

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2016 Summer Term 2

HS 431 - Vegetable Production

Units: 4

Principles and practices of production and marketing of seventeen vegetable crops grown in the U.S. Additional topics include pest management, seed technology, food safety, sustainable agriculture, use of genetically engineered crops, and consumer issues.

Offered in Fall Only

HS 432 - Introduction to Permaculture

Units: 3

Permaculture means "permanent culture," and ..."is the conscious design and maintenance of cultivated ecosystems that have the diversity, stability, and resilience of a natural ecosystem." [Bill Mollison] This course will explore a design/thinking methodology that seeks to provide our essential physical needs, food, water, shelter, energy, etc., while doing so in an environmentally friendly, sustainable manner. The three weekend field trips are required. This course is restricted to upper level undergraduate, graduate, or matriculated continuing education students. STUDENTS MAY NOT RECEIVE CREDIT FOR BOTH HS 432 AND HS 532.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term 2016 Summer Term 1

HS 451 - Plant Nutrition

Units: 3

An understanding of the basic mineral nutrient requirements, nutritional monitoring procedures, and fertilizer application methods in horticultural production systems including those for fruits, field vegetables, fruits and vegetables under plasticulture, nursery crops, landscapes, greenhouse flowers and vegetables, interior plantscapes, hydroponics, and organic farming.

Offered in Spring Only

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2016 Spring Term

HS 462 - Postharvest Physiology

Units: 3

Preharvest and postharvest factors that affect market quality of horticultural commodities with an emphasis on technologies to preserve postharvest quality and extend storage life of fruits, vegetables and ornamentals.

Offered in Spring Only

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2016 Spring Term

HS 423 - Viticulture

Units: 3

A presentation of the commercial importance, distribution, anatomy, physiology, and production of Genus Vitis [grapes] including cultivars, propagation, canopy management, diseases, weed control, physiology, anatomy, irrigation, wine production, climates and soils. This course will not require students to provide their own transportation. Non-scheduled class time for field trips or out-of-class activities IS required for this class

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Select One

PP 315 - Principles of Plant Pathology

Units: 4

Fundamental principles of plant pathology with emphasis on disease etiology, nature of pathogenesis, ecology of host/parasite interaction, epidemiology of plant diseases, current strategies and practices for integrated disease control.

Offered in Fall Only

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2016 Spring Term

PP 318 - Forest Pathology

Units: 3

Major diseases of forest trees and deterioration of wood products emphasizing principles of plant pathology; diagnosis; nature, physiology, ecology, and dissemination of disease-causing agents; mechanisms of pathogenesis; epidemiology and environmental influences; principles and practices of control.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term 2016 Fall Term

ENT 425 - General Entomology

Units: 3

Explores the science of entomology by focusing on the basic principles of systematics, morphology, physiology, development, behavior, ecology, and control of insects. Field trips provide opportunities to collect insects and study their adaptations to a wide variety of natural environments.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2016 Fall Term

SSC 200 - Soil Science

Units: 3

Fundamentals of soils including origin, composition and classification; their physical, chemical, and biological properties; significance of these properties to soil-plant relationships and soil management.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2016 Spring Term 2016 Fall Term

SSC 341 - Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management

Units: 3

The course provides detailed information on plant nutrition, soil fertility, and management of essential plant nutrients and other amendments affecting plant growth and nutrition. The influence of numerous biological, physical, and chemical soil properties on plant nutrient availability will be emphasized. Students will be familiar with contemporary diagnostic tools to assess nutrient availability, and the soil and nutrient management technologies essential for enhancing soil and plant productivity while minimizing the impact of nutrient use on the environment.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2016 Spring Term 2016 Summer Term 1 2016 Fall Term

Tuition Level: Undergraduate

Resident
Cost per Credit Hour: $231.88
Total Estimated Cost for 15 Credits Completed at NC State: $3,478.20

Non-resident
Cost per Credit Hour: $647.88
Total Estimated Cost for 15 Credits Completed at NC State: $9,718.20

Approximate cost per semester: $2,086.92 based on 9 credit hours

Note: There may be additional fees associated with Distance Education courses for verification of student identity for proctored examinations. These fees will be paid directly by the student to the proctor or facility and are not charged to your student account.

More about Online and Distance Education Tuition

Entry Semester Application Deadlines and Details
FallAugust 15, 2017
SpringJanuary 5, 2017
SummerMay 15, 2017