Nutrition

 

Master | Nutrition

Program Format:   
Entrance Exam: GRE

The Master of Nutrition is a non-thesis, applied degree. Upon completion of the degree, graduates possess a broad knowledge of nutrition science and related fields and the management of this field and are capable of effectively communicating scientific information.

The Master of Nutrition curriculum requires 36 credit hours of coursework, which includes up to 6 credits of a directed practicum or internship or related independent project. Students will be able to select between a human nutrition emphasis and a feed science emphasis. A majority of the program coursework is in graduate-level nutrition and related science. The professional skills component that qualifies students for the Professional Science Masters (PSM) designation consists of a variety of relevant courses and activities developed in consultation with prospective employers. Emphasis areas can include either Feed Science or Human Nutrition, Food, and Bioprocessing.

Eligibility

To be considered for admission, you should:

  • Hold a B.S degree in a science-related area, including coursework in biology and organic chemistry;
  • Have a minimum GPA of 3.0;
  • Score at or above the 30th percentile in all categories on the GRE; and
  • Have a TOEFL score of 80 or higher and/or IELTS of 6.5 or higher (for international students only).

**NOTE: We recommend higher scores to increase competitiveness within the program.

When you apply for a Master of Nutrition (non-thesis option), you need to:

  • Choose your program (Traditional or Distance Education); and
  • Choose your emphasis:
    • Master of Nutrition (non-thesis);
    • Professional Science Master of Nutrition-Human Nutrition Emphasis; or
    • Professional Science Master of Nutrition-Feed Science Emphasis.

The Nutrition program is an interdepartmental program, including the:

  • Department of Food, Bioprocessing & Nutrition Sciences;
  • Department of Animal Science;
  • Department of Poultry Science; and the
  • College of Veterinary Medicine.

Cost

This master's degree requires 36 credit hours. At 2018-19 tuition rates, the cost of the required courses is $453 per credit for North Carolina residents and $1,261 per credit for non-residents. Thus, the total estimated cost for the 36-credit program is $16,308 for North Carolina residents and $45,396 for non-residents.  See Online and Distance Education Tuition and Fees for cost details.

Plan of Study

Program: Master of Nutrition–Professional Science Master

  • The Master of Nutrition is a non-thesis, applied degree. Upon completion of the degree, graduates possess a broad knowledge of nutrition science and related fields and the management of this field and are capable of effectively communicating scientific information. The curriculum requires 36 credit hours of coursework, which can include up to 6 credits of a directed practicum or internship. Students will be able to select between a human nutrition emphasis and a feed science emphasis.
  • Nine credits per semester is considered a full-time graduate load at NC State University.
  • A majority of the program coursework is in graduate-level science courses.
    • At minimum, 15-16 credit hours of nutrition science courses are required (excluding the internship). The requirement for Professional Development (Plus) courses is at least 9 credits and at most 12 credits, leaving 6 credits for science electives.
    • Total science courses: 21-24 credits
    • Total PLUS courses: 12-15 credits (including internship)
  • The professional skills component (often called the “plus” component of a “science-plus degree”) consists of a variety of relevant courses and activities developed in consultation with prospective employers. The professional component should result in a portfolio of experiences recognized by and involving the client employers. The professional skills component will contain:
    • Activities developed in consultation with current or prospective employers (3-6 credits  required). Students will participate in internships developed by the nutrition program and employers or propose other internships and problem-based projects sponsored by employers. Examples of internships under development include work with the NC State University Feed Mill (feed mill operation and management), the local Mothers Milk Bank (processing and lactation consulting), state government (feed inspection and label verification), a non-profit community action organization concerned with food security (community nutrition) and a retail functional food outlet (nutritional product development, marketing, and communications). Students will receive recognition for these activities through registration in FM 594  Advanced Feed Mill Practicum, or NTR 665-601 Nutrition, Food and Feed Science Practicum. Representatives from these organizations serve on an industry advisory board.
    •  Communications and instructional skills training (FM/NTR 601 Seminar, in which presentation is required and skills are taught)
    • Management skills (at least 9 credits are required for the business, management, and regulatory courses listed in Appendix 1, Group B)
  • Students enrolled will agree to maintain contact with the program to track the career trajectory of every graduate in order to help assess program outcomes and success.
  • Additional information and Professional Science Master programs is available at the website developed by the Council of Graduate Schools at www.sciencemasters.com.
The curriculum requires 36 credit hours of coursework, which can include up to 6 credits of a directed practicum or internship. Course requirements are divided into three groupings. Students should select 16 or more credits from group A (excluding the employer projects/internship courses). 9-12 credits from group B if you also want to complete the Professional Science Master degree. If not, choose an additional 9-12 credits from group C electives. All students should choose the appropriate number of electives from group C to total a minimum of 36 credits.

Group A Core Courses

Choose One

BCH 451 - Principles of Biochemistry

Units: 4

Introduction to and survey of the fundamental principles of biochemistry, emphasizing the chemistry of living organisms, chemical structures, and interactions of and between biomolecules.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

NTR 501 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

Units: 3

Nutritional biochemistry and physiology as it relates to establishment of nutrient requirements and Dietary Reference Intakes. Digestion, absorption, metabolism, storage, and excretion of nutrients and other markers of nutritional adequacy or excess with emphasis on micronutrients. Functions of nutrients, in bone muscle, blood, growth and development and communication. Credit will not be awarded for both NTR [FS] 401 and NTR [FS] 501.

Offered in Fall and Summer

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

NOTE: an equivalent course taken at the undergraduate level can be substituted
Choose One

BCH 553 - Biochemistry of Gene Expression

Units: 3

Structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. Synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Gene expression and Regulation. Methodologies of recombinant DNA research. Credit is not allowed for both BCH 453 and BCH 553.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term 2019 Spring Term

BCH 571 - Regulation of Metabolism

Units: 3

Study of hormonal, enzymatic and molecular-genetic regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; emphasis on mammalian species.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

Choose One

NTR 601 - Master's Seminar

Units: 1

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term 2019 Spring Term

FM 460 - Feed Mill Operations and Leadership

Units: 3

Principles and current practices of modern feed mill operations. Topics include managing employees, team building, safety, budgets, regulations, and key performance indicators.

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

Choose Two or More - a minimum of 8 credit hours

NTR 500 - Principles of Human Nutrition

Units: 3

Overview of fields of Nutritional Sciences; functions of nutrients in the human body; sources and properties of nutrients; relationships of food industry practices to nutrition. Credit will not be given for both NTR [FS]400 and NTR 500

Offered in Fall and Summer

NTR 501 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

Units: 3

Nutritional biochemistry and physiology as it relates to establishment of nutrient requirements and Dietary Reference Intakes. Digestion, absorption, metabolism, storage, and excretion of nutrients and other markers of nutritional adequacy or excess with emphasis on micronutrients. Functions of nutrients, in bone muscle, blood, growth and development and communication. Credit will not be awarded for both NTR [FS] 401 and NTR [FS] 501.

Offered in Fall and Summer

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

NTR 510 - Maternal and Infant Nutrition

Units: 3

Students will explore the current research, controversies, and biological mechanisms related to nutrition for women before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as for infants in utero and after birth.

Offered in Spring and Summer

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

NTR 521 - Life Cycle Nutrition

Units: 3

This course focuses on the physiologic changes and nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Additionally, students will explore psychosocial and environmental influencers on food consumption and diet quality at each stage of life. Pregnancy and lactation, fetal development, infancy, early childhood, childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and geriatrics will be examined. Student will apply course content to real-world settings through individual and/or group service-learning projects. Credit will not be given for both NTR 421 and NTR 521.

Offered in Spring Only

NTR 525 - Feed Manufacturing Technology

Units: 3

Feed mill management, feed ingredient purchasing, inventory, storage, and quality evaluation, computerized feed formulation, feeding programs for poultry and swine, feed mill design, equipment, maintenance, operation, safety, state and federal regulations pertaining to feed manufacture.

Offered in Fall and Spring

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NTR 550 - Applied Ruminant Nutrition

Units: 3

Applied concepts in ruminant nutrition for the practicing agricultural professional. Protein, energy, vitamin and mineral nutrition in relation to the nutritional needs and practical feeding of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, and goats. New developments in feeding systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. Emphasis on solving problems in case studies. Permission given to undergraduates

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

NTR 554 - Lactation, Milk, and Nutrition

Units: 3

Nutritional properties of milk as a high-quality food with nutritional diversity. Principles of physiology, biochemistry and cell biology in the mammary gland. Procedures of milk production and milk collection for milk quality and nutrition. Human lactation vs. that of domestic animals. Impacts of biotechnology and food safety on dairy production. Credit will not be given for both ANS 454 and 554.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

NTR 555 - Exercise Nutrition

Units: 3

Metabolism of macro- and micronutrients as affected by exercise and physical activity. Effects of dietary patterns, specific foods, dietary supplements and ergogenic aids on sports performance. Reading and discussion of current literature and individual or group projects.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

NTR 701 - Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism

Units: 3

Study of protein and amino acid metabolism, regulation, dietary requirements and techniques for their investigation in human and other animals.

Offered in Spring Only

NTR 706 - Vitamin Metabolism

Units: 3

Structures, chemical and physical properties, functions, distribution, absorption, transport, metabolism, storage, excretion, deficiencies, and toxicity of vitamins in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between vitamins and other factors affecting vitamin metabolism or bioavailability as well as the nutritional significance of essential fatty acids and metabolism of prostaglandins, prostacyclins and leukotrienes. Application of knowledge will include critical review of scientific literature, experimental design, and formulation of vitamin supplements.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

NTR 708 - Energy Metabolism

Units: 3

Relationship of biochemical and physiological events within the cell, tissue, organ and system with the nutrient needs as sources of energy for productive animal life. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of energy sources. Presentation of processesof energy transformations within living structures in relation to energetics, biological oxidations, coupled reactions, anabolic and catabolic systems, metabolic control, partitioning and efficiency.

Offered in Fall Only

NTR 775 - Mineral Metabolism

Units: 3

Requirements, function, distribution, absorption, excretion and toxicity of minerals in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between minerals and other factors affecting mineral metabolism or availability. Emphasis on mechanisms associated withmineral functions and the metabolic bases for the development of signs of deficiency.

Offered in Fall Only

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NTR 785 - Digestion and Metabolism in Ruminants

Units: 3

Advanced concepts in ruminant digestion and metabolism, with emphasis on bovine, ovine, and caprine species. Major topics include voluntary intake, ruminal fermentation, mechanisms and rates of digestion, absorption and passage of dietary components, and postabsorptive metabolism of carbohydrates, lipds, and proteins. New developments in feeding systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

NTR 790 - Advanced Feed Formulation

Units: 3

Principles of feed and ingredient quality assurance and how to develop a comprehensive quality assurance program. The course will include the development of an approved supplier list, ingredient specifications, feed manufacturing quality assurance procedures, and risk based feed safety programs.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

Choose One

FM 594 - Advanced Feed Mill Practicum

Units: 1

This course will teach students the principles of operating a modern feed mill. Students will receive ingredients, grind grain, manufacture feed, and perform quality checks on finished feed products. Students will complete safety, quality assurance, and feed processing training units as part of their training.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

Group B Professional Science Master Courses

NOTE: Business, leadership and professional development courses may be taken from NCSU, or through UNC-Online at other campuses. 
Courses Available through NC State

FS 553 - Food Laws and Regulations

Units: 3

Federal and state laws and regulations, and case law history affecting food production, processing, packaging, marketing, and distribution of food and food products. History of food law, enactment of laws and regulations, legal research, and regulatory agencies.Credit will not be given for both FS 453 and FS 553.

PA 508 - Government & Public Administration

Units: 1

Public administration and policy making in U.S. political system. Covers Presidency, Congress, Supreme Court, Federal Reserve System, state and local government, intergovenmental relations. Credit is not allowed if student has prior credit for 3 ormore undergraduate American government courses

Offered in Fall Only

PA 525 - Organizational Development and Change Management

Units: 3

This course provides an introduction to the applied skills and knowledge necessary for helping public and nonprofit organizations and agencies effectively manage change. Students will gain knowledge and skills in organizational assessment, action research, systems change, and the stages of change management. Graduate standing only.

Offered in Spring Only

TED 556 - Laboratory Management and Safety in TED

Units: 3

Laboratory management, planning, and safety considerations for technology education. Analysis of recent research, environmental factors, development of a safety system, safety education, and legal implications. Use of student leaders in managementof a safe learning environment. Offfered by Distance Education Only

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

FM 460 - Feed Mill Operations and Leadership

Units: 3

Principles and current practices of modern feed mill operations. Topics include managing employees, team building, safety, budgets, regulations, and key performance indicators.

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

BAE 578 - Agricultural Waste Management

Units: 3

This course covers principles of managing, handling, treating and applying animal and poultry manures and organic byproducts from an engineering perspective. Topics include waste characterization, descriptions of systems and technology, land application principles, preparation of waste management plans, biochemical/biological processes, and potential impacts to the environment. Assignments include homework, quizzes, projects, and discussion that emphasize problem solving and analysis.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

FW 726 - Quantitative Fisheries Management

Units: 3

Current methods for assessment and management of exploited fish populations, including sampling methods, data analysis and modeling. A required research paper or project.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

Courses Available at Other Universities
East Carolina University - ACCT 6521 Accounting for Decision MakingMGMT 6102 Comparative Management
University of North Carolina Pembroke - ACC 5010 Foundations of Financial and Managerial Accounting
Western Carolina University - MBA 500 Accounting and Finance for Management AnalysisHR 660 Career Development/Management SystemsENT 610 Entrepreneurial CreationENT 620 Entrepreneurial PlanningPM 650 Fundamentals of Project Management

Group C Elective Courses

ANS 561 - Equine Nutrition

Units: 3

This course explores concepts in equine nutrition including digestive physiology of horses, nutrient requirements for different classes of horses and feed management. Ration evaluation and balancing, as well as problem solving will be a core component to this course.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

BAE 578 - Agricultural Waste Management

Units: 3

This course covers principles of managing, handling, treating and applying animal and poultry manures and organic byproducts from an engineering perspective. Topics include waste characterization, descriptions of systems and technology, land application principles, preparation of waste management plans, biochemical/biological processes, and potential impacts to the environment. Assignments include homework, quizzes, projects, and discussion that emphasize problem solving and analysis.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

BAE 528 - Biomass to Renewable Energy Processes

Units: 3

This course will introduce fundamental principles and practical applications of biomass-to-renewable energy processes, including anaerobic digestion of organic wastes for biogas and hydrogen production, bioethanol production from starch and lignocellulosic materials, biodiesel production from plant oils, and thermoconversion of biomass and waste materials. Restricted to engineering seniors and graduate standing in COE, CALS, PAMS or CNR.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

ANS 561 - Equine Nutrition

Units: 3

This course explores concepts in equine nutrition including digestive physiology of horses, nutrient requirements for different classes of horses and feed management. Ration evaluation and balancing, as well as problem solving will be a core component to this course.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

CS 424 - Seed Physiology

Units: 3

This course will explore the physiological processes associated with seed formation, development, maturation, germination, and deterioration of agronomic and horticultural species. We will also study the physiological aspects of seed dormancy, how dormancy is manifested and overcome in cultivated and noncultivated systems and dormancy's impact on weed seedbank ecology.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

FS 591 - Special Problems In Food Science

Units: 1 - 6

Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest in foods. Problems designed to provide training and experience in research.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term 2019 Spring Term

HS 590 - Special Problems in Horticultural Science

Units: 1 - 6

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

PRT 505 - GIS and Spatial Analysis in PRTS

Units: 3

Introduction to spatial reasoning and spatial analysis as implemented in geographic information systems [GIS] to perform evaluation and research in parks, recreation, tourism, and sport settings. This course is restricted to PRTM master's degree students or others with consent of the instructor.

Offered in Spring Only

Find this course:

2019 Spring Term

SSC 541 - Soil Fertility

Units: 3

Soil conditions affecting plant growth and the chemistry of soil and fertilizer interrelationships. Factors affecting the availability of nutrients. Methods of measuring nutrient availability.

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term 2019 Spring Term 2019 Summer Term 1

TOX 501 - Principles of Toxicology

Units: 4

Introduce students to the basic principles of toxicology. Will cover the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of toxicants; types and mechanisms of toxic action; carcinogenesis; environmental toxicology as well as human and ecological risk assessment.

Offered in Spring Only

FM 580 - Feed and Ingrdient Quality Assurance

Units: 3

The course will teach students the principles of feed and ingredient quality assurance and how to develop a comprehensive quality assurance program. The course will include the development of an approved supplier list, ingredient specifications, feed manufacturing quality assurance procedures, and risk based feed safety programs.

Offered in Fall Only

Find this course:

2018 Fall Term

 
Entry Semester Application Deadlines and Details
FallJun 25 (US); Mar 1 (Int)
SpringNov 25 (US); Jul 15 (Int)
Summer 1Mar 25 (US); Dec 15 (Int)
Summer 2May 10 (US); Dec 15 (Int)

Dr. Jonathan Allen

Interdepartmental Nutrition Program Coordinator

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

919.513.2257
nutrition_program@ncsu.edu