Watershed Assessment and Restoration

 

Graduate Certificate | Watershed Assessment and Restoration

Program Format:   
Entrance Exam: Not required

The Graduate Certificate in the Design and Analysis of Environmental Systems: Watershed Assessment and Restoration offers post-baccalaureate studies and training that provide excellent opportunities for practicing engineers and other environmental professionals to stay abreast of new technologies and current government regulations. Biological and agricultural engineers at NC State run a world-class stormwater management program and create energy from duckweed. In this field, you'll apply engineering principles to biologically based systems that involve the production of food and conservation of our natural resources.

Our Graduate Certificate in the Design and Analysis of Environmental Systems: Watershed Assessment and Restoration, taught by NC State Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering faculty, offers high-level coursework with the benefit of more in-depth study than offered in short courses and workshops. This program is a mixture of face-to-face and distance education courses, allowing you to select courses which reflect your interests and learning style.

With our certificate program, you can formally certify competency in environmental engineering with an emphasis on watershed management and restoration. Although not a graduate degree, this graduate certificate may satisfy many of your needs for professional development. Should you later decide that a formal graduate degree best suits your needs, then some coursework from this program may transfer. However, successful completion of this certificate program does not guarantee admission to a graduate degree program.

Program Objectives

  • Enable students and practitioners from many disciplines to study the technical and engineering aspects of design and analysis of environmental systems with an emphasis on the watershed-scale.
  • Provide students the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in engineering systems targeted at environmental issues, particularly related to non-point sources and their impact on water quality at the watershed-scale.
  • Provide practicing engineers and other professionals a source of graduate-level engineering education in the environmental field.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

There are two paths to admission:

  1. For applicants who hold a B.S. degree from an accredited undergraduate engineering program, an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of 2.8 combined with a major GPA of 3.0 is required.
  2. For applicants who hold a B.S. degree in an appropriate science curriculum, an overall GPA of 3.0 is required.

All applicants must have completed calculus, differential equations, physics and chemistry with grades of C or better. A program that includes fluid mechanics or hydraulics is highly recommended. In addition, environmental professionals may qualify based on experience. Contact the program director for more information.

All applicants must submit:

  • Final transcript of baccalaureate program
  • Transcripts of all post-baccalaureate coursework
  • Personal statement of reasons for pursuing the program

Students may begin taking courses for the certificate in Summer, Fall or Spring.

PLAN OF STUDY

The certificate requires 12 credit hours.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Post-baccalaureate studies and training provide excellent opportunities for practicing engineers and other environmental professionals to stay abreast of new technologies and current government regulations. This certificate program formally certifies competency in ecosystem or environmental engineering with an emphasis on watershed management and restoration. Although not a graduate degree, this program may satisfy needs for professional development.

Students must complete 12 credit hours at the graduate level. Nine credit hours must be from the BAE graduate course list. With the approval of the program director, one course (up to 3 credit hours) from outside of BAE may be included.

BAE 502 - Instrumentation for Hydrologic Applications

Units: 3

Basic theory of instruments and measurements. Physical parameters of interest, available methods and sensors for assessment. Sensor characteristics. Dataloggers and sensor-datalogger communications. Data transfer, management, and processing. Emphasis on hydrologic and water quality research applications. Course offered by Distance Education only.

Offered in Spring Only

BAE 528 - Biomass to Renewable Energy Processes

Units: 3

This course will introduce fundamental principles and practical applications of biomass-to-renewable energy processes, including anaerobic digestion of organic wastes for biogas and hydrogen production, bioethanol production from starch and lignocellulosic materials, biodiesel production from plant oils, and thermoconversion of biomass and waste materials. Restricted to engineering seniors and graduate standing in COE, CALS, PAMS or CNR.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

BAE 535 - Precision Agriculture Technology

Units: 3

Overview of technology available for implementation of a comprehensive precision agriculture program. Topics include computers, GPS, sensors, mechanized soil sampling, variable rate control system, yield monitors, and postharvest processing controls. Applications of precision agriculture in crop planning, tillage, planting, chemical applications, harvesting and postharvest processing. Credit may not be received for BAE/SSC 435 and BAE/SSC 535

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

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2018 Spring Term

BAE 536 - GIS Applications in Precision Agriculture

Units: 1

Exploration of geographic information systems [GIS] and its applications in precision agriculture. Topics will include file structure and formatting, interfacing with precision agriculture equipment, georeferencing maps, merging and clipping farm data, data field calculations, designing management zones, variable rate prescriptions, and basic data analysis.

Offered in Spring Only

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2018 Spring Term

BAE 572 - Irrigation and Drainage

Units: 3

Design, management and evaluation of irrigation and drainage systems; concepts and processes of system design. Credit will not be given for both BAE 472 and BAE 572.

Offered in Spring Only

BAE 573 - Introduction to Surface/Water Quality Modeling

Units: 3

Concepts in basic hydrologic, erosion and chemical transport used in modeling. Evaluation of typical hydrologic/water quality models on watershed systems. Project examples using state-of-the-art models. Credit will not be given for both BAE 473 and BAE 573.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

BAE 574 - DRAINMOD: Theory and Application

Units: 3

This course presents the theory of water movement and storage in poorly drained soils and applies the drainage/water management model DRAINMOD to a wide range of problems. Technical issues related to evaluation, design and management of drained soils and to wetland hydrology are analyzed. A series of problem sets provides experience in using the model, and demonstrates how the model may be applied to describe the complex interactions of multiple processses affecting hydrology of shallow water table soils.

Offered in Spring Only

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2018 Spring Term

BAE 575 - Design of Structural Stormwater Best Management Practices

Units: 3

The design of structural stormwater Best Management Practices [BMPs] used in the urban and suburban environments is reviewed, including stormwater wetlands, bio-retention areas, sand filters, innovative wet ponds, green roofs, permeable pavement, and reinforced grass swales. The course is application oriented and includes a pair of field trips.

Offered in Spring Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

BAE 576 - Watershed Monitoring and Assessment

Units: 3

Water measurement and structure sizing. Identification of water quality problems and water quality variable selection. Monitoring design, water quality sampling equipment, and sample collection and analysis. Statistical analysis and presentation of water quality data.

Offered in Fall Only

BAE 578 - Agricultural Waste Management

Units: 3

This course covers principles of managing, handling, treating and applying animal and poultry manures and organic byproducts from an engineering perspective. Topics include waste characterization, descriptions of systems and technology, land application principles, preparation of waste management plans, biochemical/biological processes, and potential impacts to the environment. Assignments include homework, quizzes, projects, and discussion that emphasize problem solving and analysis.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

BAE 579 - Stream Channel Assessment and Restoration

Units: 3

Applications of fluvial geomorphology principles for assessment and restoration of natural stream channels. Topics include stream processes related to channel formation, bankfull channel dimensions, stream classification, morphological assessments, stream stability, restoration options for unstable channels, natural channel design approaches, and stream morphology monitoring. Field exercises include channel surveying using total stations, stream classification, and stability assessment. Field trips to stream restoration projects are included.

BAE 580 - Introduction to Land and Water Engineering

Units: 3

This distance course introduces students to concepts of the hydrologic cycle, water quality, precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, watershed delineation, surface runoff and open channel flow. Students will apply these concepts to an engineering design problem. This course is designed for non-engineering distance graduate students and lifelong education students and students from engineering disciplines outside of BAE. It will not substitute for BAE 471. The course is only open to students with senior standing or higher.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

BAE 581 - Open Channel Hydraulics for Natural Systems

Units: 3

Theory and applications of hydraulics to open channels with an emphasis on natural streams and rivers. Course will introduce and develop principles of flow regimes [subcritical/critical/supercritical], and types [uniform flow, gradually varied and rapidly varied flow]. Application will include hydraulics of flow measuring devices, step-backwater analysis and rating curve development, and flood studies using hydraulic models. A lab-scale flume will be used to illustrate concepts. Laptops will be used in class to learn and apply HEC-RAS [water surface profiles model]. CE 382 or equivalent required. CE 381 recommended.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Odd Years

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BAE 582 - Risk and Failure Assessment of Stream Restoration Structures

Units: 1

This course defines uncertainty and risk pertaining to stream restoration structures and identifies and quantifies sources of such. Students will review various in-stream structures and, using an example study of the rock cross vane as a guide, will investigate a structure of their choice applying the concepts of risk and uncertainty. Modules include: Introduction to structures and definitions; Types and modes of failure; Uncertainty in Stream Restoration Design; Probability of failures, cost of failures; and Failure modes and effects.

Offered in Spring Only

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2018 Spring Term

BAE 583 - Ecohydraulics and River Corridor Function

Units: 1

This course provides an ecological perspective of lotic systems and introduces students to ecological processes that structure river corridors. This course defines hydraulic, hydrologic, chemical, sedimentary, and biotic influences on an aquatic ecosystem. The five modules define components of aquatic ecosystems and their interactions, and explore ecological implications of engineered designs and cause-effect relationships from the watershed scale down to individual organisms. This course assumes students have a working knowledge of general biological and physical principles related to fluvial ecosystems.

Offered in Spring Only

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2018 Spring Term

BAE 584 - Introduction to Fluvial Geomorphology

Units: 3

This distance course provides an introduction to applied fluvial geomorphology as it relates to natural physical stream processes. Students will learn about watershed hydrology, stream gage data analysis, bankfull stage identification, hydraulic geometry relationships, stream channel assessment and classification, stream stability and channel evolution.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

BAE 585 - Integrating AutoCAD Civil 3D and GIS

Units: 1

Basics of the AutoCAD Civil 3D user interface, drawing tools, importing and handling of survey data, generation of surfaces. GIS data sources and formats. Accessing and using GIS data for Civil 3D design purposes. Creation of GIS objects within Civil 3D and exporting to GIS formats.

Offered in Fall Only

BAE 590 - Special Problems

Units: 1 - 6

Selection of a subject by each student on which to do research and write a technical report on the results. The individual may choose a subject pertaining to his or her particular interest in any area of study in biological and agricultural engineering.

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2018 Spring Term 2018 Fall Term

BAE 590 - Special Problems

Units: 1 - 6

Selection of a subject by each student on which to do research and write a technical report on the results. The individual may choose a subject pertaining to his or her particular interest in any area of study in biological and agricultural engineering.

Find this course:

2018 Spring Term 2018 Fall Term

BAE 771 - Theory Of Drainage--Saturated Flow

Units: 3

Discussion of physical concepts and properties of fluids and porous media in relation to soil-water movement. Derivation and discussion of the fundamental laws and equations governing saturated flow in porous media. Analysis of mathematical solutions of steady-state and transient flow equations to determine their applicability to drainage problems. Consideration of analogs and models of particular drainage problems.

Offered in Fall Only

YEAR: Offered Alternate Years

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2018 Fall Term

CE 584 - Hydraulics Of Ground Water

Units: 3

Introduction to ground water hydraulics and hydrology. Hydrologic cycle, basic ground water hydraulics, numerical solution of governing equations, ground water hydrology of North Carolina, well design and construction, flow net development, and ground water contamination sources.

Offered in Fall Only

CE 586 - Engineering Hydrology

Units: 3

Hydrologic principles underlying procedures for surface water modeling; applications of common hydrologic models to actual watersheds.

Offered in Fall Only

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2018 Fall Term

CE 775 - Modeling and Analysis Of Environmental Systems

Units: 3

Movement and fate of pollutant discharges. Development and application of analytical solutions and numerical models. Role of these models in planning and management. Mathematical programming models. Alternative management strategies: direct regulation, charges and transferable discharge permits. Multiple objectives: cost, equity and certainty of outcome.

Offered in Fall Only

CE 784 - Ground Water Contaminant Transport

Units: 3

Introduction to movement and attenuation of contaminants in the subsurface. Common contaminant sources; advection and dispersion; numerical modeling of contaminant transport; chemical and biological processes in the subsurface; and ground water restoration technology.

Offered in Spring Only

GIS 521 - Surface Water Hydrology with GIS

Units: 3

The application of geographic information systems [GIS] to surface water modeling including stream and watershed delineations, regulatory wetlands jurisdiction determinations, and flood mapping. In addition students will develop spatial computation methods to support hydrological analysis in land use planning, landscape management, and engineering assessments.

Offered in Fall and Spring

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2018 Spring Term 2018 Fall Term

SSC 511 - Soil Physics

Units: 4

Soil physical properties and theory of selected instrumentation to measure them. Topics including soil solids, soil water, air and heat. Emphasis on transport processes and the energy concept of soil and water.

Offered in Fall Only

SSC 521 - Soil Chemistry

Units: 3

A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay and soil systems, including ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, solvation of clays and electrokinetic properties of clay-water systems.

Offered in Spring Only

SSC 545 - Remote Sensing Applications in Soil Science and Agriculture

Units: 3

Overview of remote sensing including history, evolution, vocabulary, and physical principles, i.e., electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with matter. Distant and proximate remote sensing techniques [aerial photography, satellite imaging, radar, lidar, etc.], hardware, and platforms and their application in the characterization and management of soils and crops. Development of strategies for incorporating remote sensing into soil and agronomic research, and of practical skills for processing, analysis, display, and discussion of remote sensing data with applications in soil science and agriculture.

YEAR: Offered Alternate Even Years

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2018 Spring Term

SSC 570 - Wetland Soils

Units: 3

Wetland definitions, concepts, functions and regulations; chemical, physical and morphological characteristics of wetland soils. Wetland soil identification using field indicators and monitoring equipment; principles of wetland creation, restoration and mitigation. Special project required for SSC 570. Two mandatory field trips. Field trips for distance education students are not required but optional. Credit will not be given for both SSC 470 and SSC 570.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Find this course:

2018 Spring Term 2018 Summer Term 1 2018 Fall Term

The two BAE 590 special problems courses listed above are: BAE 590 Wetland Design and BAE 590 Water/Nutrient Management for Sustainability.
To earn the certificate, the student must earn an overall GPA of 3.0 on all courses in the program; no grade below C- may be included.
BAE 570 Soil Water Movement is a general prerequisite for the program and is not included in the 12 credit hours required to earn the certificate. Students who complete SSC 511 Soil Physics or an equivalent course with a C or better will be considered to have met this prerequisite.
Entry Semester Application Deadlines and Details

BAE Graduate Certificate Director

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

919.515.3121
gradcert-bae@ncsu.edu

Heather Austin

Student Services Specialist

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

919.515.6710
heather_austin@ncsu.edu

Dr. John Classen

Director of Graduate Programs, Biological and Agricultural Engineering

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

919.515.6755
john_classen@ncsu.edu