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Courses

Required Core Courses (6 credits)

Units: 3

This course covers laws, regulations and agencies involved in the registration of conventional, biotechnology and biological crops, crop protectants and growth regulators. US and International laws and regulations will be discussed from technical proof of concept through commercial release.

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

This course goes into additional depth and provides hands-on exercises concerning agriculture regulatory topics covered in CS 418/518. The course will introduce laws, regulations and agencies involved in the fertilizer, animal and waste management as well as the role of public policy in the regulatory process. CS 418/518 is a prerequisite for this class.

Offered in Spring Only

Elective Courses (9 credits)

Units: 3

Role of Biotechnology in Society is an introductory science course that takes a semi-technical look at the emerging role of biotechnology in human society. Expectations are that students will gain an appreciation for biotechnology and gain the ability to understand how biotechnology works. Offered only in Poland through Study Abroad Program [4-week course].

GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Offered in Summer

Units: 3

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of biochemistry. It emphasizes biochemical structures, properties, and functions, including enzyme kinetics and major metabolic processes. It can serve as a prerequisite for BCH 452 with permission of the department. This course is designed for those students who are not majoring in Biochemistry and do not require a more comprehensive introduction to biochemistry. It is not intended for graduate students. Credit is not allowed for both BCH 351 and BCH 451. Prerequisites CH 223 [or CH 227] and BIO 183 are required. CH 201 [or CH 203] is strongly recommended, but not required.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 4

Introduction to and survey of the fundamental principles of biochemistry, emphasizing the chemistry of living organisms, chemical structures, and interactions of and between biomolecules.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 2

Laboratory experiences in this course are designed to compliment the first semester undergraduate biochemistry course, BCH 451. Basic skills to be mastered include the use of volumetric equipment, spectrophotometers, chromatography, and electrophoresis. You will also learn to assay small quantities of biological materials and analyze lab data. You will learn to manipulate biochemical materials from three of the four major subgroups: proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. You will determine structural elements at a number of analytical levels and learn how to think about their functional capabilities. We will emphasize theoretical information, while discussing how the techniques work. The explanations discuss how the techniques work. We focus on how consecutive methods are interconnected to form process chains.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Units: 3

Structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. Synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. Gene expression and Regulation. Methodologies of recombinant DNA research. Credit is not allowed for both BCH 453 and BCH 553.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 3

This lecture-based course introduces students to the quality systems used to meet the regulatory requirements for developing, testing, manufacturing, and selling medical products in the global marketplace. It provides a general background for those going into the medical products field, but is especially useful to students preparing for a career in the Regulatory Affairs or Quality Assurance Department within a pharmaceutical, biomanufacturing, or medical device company. BEC 575 students must have graduate standing.

Offered in Fall and Spring

TERM: Offered in Fall and Spring

Units: 3

Introduce the fundamental principles and modern techniques of chemical analyses. This includes examination of electrolytic solutions, including acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and solubility equilibria, and introduction to spectrochemical, electrochemical, volumetric and chromatographic methods of analysis, modern chemical instrumentation, and interpretation of data.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 1

Application of spectrochemical, electrochemical, volumetric, and chromatographic methods of analysis for the identification and quantification of components in a mixture.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 3

Methods of quantitative analysis based on electronic instrumentation. Signal processing and electronics, spectroscopy [atomic, x-ray fluorescence, infrared/Raman, surface], voltammetry, chromatography [gas, liquid], mass spectrometry as well as chemical transducers and statistical methods of data handling.

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

Written communication in industrial and technical organizations, emphasizing internal communication with managers and technical personnel and including external communication with regulators, vendors, and clients. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students in engineering and other primarily technological curricula.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, ENG 332, and ENG 333.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

OR

Units: 3

Written communication in scientific and research contexts, emphasizing relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students who plan careers in scientific research.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, 332, and 333.

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 3

A capstone course for students in environmental sciences or related majors. The course teaches use of analytical approaches for solving environmental problems, and for communicating results. The course emphasizes development of student projects that lead to environmental decision-making, such as devising a resource management plan, developing a predictive model, prioritizing risk, identifying tipping points, designing new software or technologies, or predicting outcomes of environmental polices. Individual student projects fit within a team framework to simulate a work environment. Students enhance writing and seminar skills. Student may incur extra expenses with projects for this course.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Units: 3

Monitoring and analysis of chemical, biological, and radiation impacts to the environment. Theory of chemical, physical, biological, and ecological monitoring. Planning and conducting environmental sampling and monitoring programs. Management, analysis, and quality assurance and control. Risk assessment in environmental technology. Laboratory practice and safety.

Offered in Spring Only

Units: 3

Leadership is a critical topic in public, nonprofit, and business administration. Leadership is what we expect of U.S. presidents, association directors, and CEOs, as well as of mid-level and frontline supervisors. Clearly, leaders are awarded the accolades when the organization succeeds and given the blame for its failures. But organizations succeed not just because of the top leader's actions; a positive leadership climate that pervades the organization helps it to learn, adapt, and perform at a high level. Only LPS major students must complete LPS 200 Introduction to Public Leadership course prior to enrolling in LPS 425.

Offered in Spring Only

Units: 3

The course will focus on the legal and regulatory environment as it impacts the design, manufacture, marketing and distribution of medical textiles and healthcare products. Fundamentals of legal theory, contract law, intellectual property, licensing, product liability and the Food and Drug Administration will be covered, providing the student with the ability to recognize and understand the legal issues involved with the medical textile supply chain.

Offered in Spring Only

Units: 4

Impact assessment principles, practices, and their evolution. Lectures and field practicums concerning problems addressed by environmental assessment practitioners. Practical implications of current regulatory requirements, especially endangered species and wetlands.

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

Introduction to gene cloning, plant tissue culture and transformation, and the development of agriculturally important transgenic traits. Critical thinking, case studies, and discussions are used to examine global approaches to the regulation and risks of genetically-modified organisms, plant and gene patents, and the consequences of these factors on food soverienty and trade. Students cannot receive credit for both PB 480 and PB 580.

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

Introduction to public policy formulation and analysis, including agenda-setting strategies, problems of legitimation, the appropriations process, implementation, evaluation, resolution, and termination.

GEP: Social Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

YEAR: Offered Alternate Years

Units: 3

Technological innovation and scientific discovery since World War II have led to profound social, political, and economic change. This course explores some of the opportunities and challenges these advances have created and the ways in which society and government seek to limit their negative effects while maximizing gains and promoting further innovation.

GEP: Social Sciences

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

Usefulness and limitations of international law, including obligations and immunities of sovereign states, non-state actors, peaceful settlement of disputes, human rights, laws of war, and recent international war crimes tribunals. Emphasis on individual case decisions in U.S. and international courts.

GEP: Global Knowledge

GEP: Social Sciences

Offered in Fall and Spring

Units: 3

Critical analysis of issues and events in world politics, including terrorism, drug trafficking and money laundering, transmission of infectious diseases, democratization, globalization and economic development.

GEP: Global Knowledge

Offered in Fall Only

Units: 3

Fundamentals of soils including origin, composition and classification; their physical, chemical, and biological properties; significance of these properties to soil-plant relationships and soil management.

GEP: Natural Sciences

Offered in Fall Spring Summer

Units: 4

Introduce students to the basic principles of toxicology. Will cover the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of toxicants; types and mechanisms of toxic action; carcinogenesis; environmental toxicology as well as human and ecological risk assessment.

Offered in Spring Only

Units: 4

Environmental toxicology and chemistry including the sources, fate, and effects of chemicals in the environment. Emphasis on contemporary problems in human health and the environment.

Offered in Fall and Spring

Academic Requirements

  • Students must complete fifteen (15) hours of coursework and have a minimum of 3.0 grade point average (GPA) on all certificate coursework. The minimum grade to receive certificate credit can be no lower than B-. Students do not have the option of taking the courses for 'credit only' if they intend for the course to be part of the undergraduate certificate.
  • Transfer credit from other institutions is not allowed for the undergraduate certificate. All course work must be registered through NC State University.
  • Up to twelve (12) hours of non-degree studies (NOS) coursework, if not already used in another program, may be transferred into the Undergraduate Certificate. All coursework must carry a grade of B- or better.
  • Up to twelve (12) hours of coursework taken while in another undergraduate program at NC State may be applied towards the Undergraduate Certificate. All such coursework must carry a grade of B- or better.
  • All certificate requirements must be completed within four (4) calendar years, beginning with the date that the student commences courses applicable to the certificate, unless a more restrictive time limit has been established by the program or academic college/school.
  • A student may obtain more than one certificate. Each certificate must have at least nine (9) credit hours that are unique to it.